Martin Luther’s 95 Theses – Part 1

In honor of Reformation Day on Sunday, October 31st, I am posting Luther’s 95 Theses over the next four days.  I hope they will serve as a reminder of the significance of the Protestant Reformation that began with the hammer strike of this document to the Wittenburg church door in 1517.  Meditate on these words and please remember that at the time of this writing Luther is still a Roman Catholic monk of the Augustinian order.

1.      When our Lord and Master, Jesus Christ, said “Repent”, He called for the entire life of believers to be one of repentance.

2.      The word cannot be properly understood as referring to the sacrament of penance, i.e. confession and satisfaction, as administered by the clergy.

3.      Yet its meaning is not restricted to repentance in one’s heart; for such repentance is null unless it produces outward signs in various mortifications of the flesh.

4.      As long as hatred of self abides (i.e. true inward repentance) the penalty of sin abides, viz., until we enter the kingdom of heaven.

5.      The pope has neither the will nor the power to remit any penalties beyond those imposed either at his own discretion or by canon law.

6.      The pope himself cannot remit guilt, but only declare and confirm that it has been remitted by God; or, at most, he can remit it in cases reserved to his discretion. Except for these cases, the guilt remains untouched.

7.      God never remits guilt to anyone without, at the same time, making him humbly submissive to the priest, His representative.

8.      The penitential canons apply only to men who are still alive, and, according to the canons themselves, none applies to the dead.

9.      Accordingly, the Holy Spirit, acting in the person of the pope, manifests grace to us, by the fact that the papal regulations always cease to apply at death, or in any hard case.

10.  It is a wrongful act, due to ignorance, when priests retain the canonical penalties on the dead in purgatory.

11.  When canonical penalties were changed and made to apply to purgatory, surely it would seem that tares were sown while the bishops were asleep.

12.  In former days, the canonical penalties were imposed, not after, but before absolution was pronounced; and were intended to be tests of true contrition.

13.  Death puts an end to all the claims of the Church; even the dying are already dead to the canon laws, and are no longer bound by them.

14.  Defective piety or love in a dying person is necessarily accompanied by great fear, which is greatest where the piety or love is least.

15.  This fear or horror is sufficient in itself, whatever else might be said, to constitute the pain of purgatory, since it approaches very closely to the horror of despair.

16.  There seems to be the same difference between hell, purgatory, and heaven as between despair, uncertainty, and assurance.

17.  Of a truth, the pains of souls in purgatory ought to be abated, and charity ought to be proportionately increased.

18.  Moreover, it does not seem proved, on any grounds of reason or Scripture, that these souls are outside the state of merit, or unable to grow in grace.

19.  Nor does it seem proved to be always the case that they are certain and assured of salvation, even if we are very certain ourselves.

20.  Therefore the pope, in speaking of the plenary remission of all penalties, does not mean “all” in the strict sense, but only those imposed by himself.

21.  Hence those who preach indulgences are in error when they say that a man is absolved and saved from every penalty by the pope’s indulgences.

22.  Indeed, he cannot remit to souls in purgatory any penalty which canon law declares should be suffered in the present life.

23.   If plenary remission could be granted to anyone at all, it would be only in the cases of the most perfect, i.e. to very few.

To be continued…

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